waterstory5Sure, drinking water is good for you. But this is just tabloid crap.

The “before” picture has been taken with a single light placed above the lady’s head. Note the shadow under the nose and the lack of catchlights in the eyes.

This type of lighting will emphasise bags under the eyes and skin blemishes.

The “after” picture has been taken using two frontal diffused lights. You can clearly see the catchlights (reflections of the light source) in the eyes. One, a round light, probably using an umbrella reflector was to the left of the camera slightly above head height and the other, a large rectangular ‘soft box’ was placed at eye level very close the the camera axis.

waterstory2These produce practically shadowless lighting which will minimise or even eliminate the shadows cast by eye bags etc and give a smoother texture to the skin.

I’m not saying they were, but it would have easily been possible to have taken both these photographs on the same day.

The lady in question has said she undertook the month-long experiment after speaking to a neurologist and nutritionist because she was suffering headaches and poor digestion. So why would she take herself off to a photographic studio to have a “before” picture taken?

waterstory3And then, we are expected to believe, she went back a month later wearing the same blouse and the same earrings and her hair in the same style and with the intervening month’s growth cut off to have the “miraculous” transformation recorded for posterity?

Do the Daily Mirror think we are all thick or something?

Worse still they have done a sloppy job of the deception. Both pictures have exactly the same perspective and image size. ie: Same camera to subject distance and same focal length lens.

It looks every bit as if the camera was set on a tripod, the first picture taken and the photographer changed the lighting whilst the lady combed her hair and had some concealer and foundation applied before sitting back in the same position.

My guess is, the “after” picture have also been retouched because the lady’s water intake has even caused some extra eyelashes to grow!

Basically, it’s a load of old tosh designed to make gullible people buy their tabloid rag.

It reinforces my belief that the only thing you can believe in the tabloids is the date – and they even get that wrong sometimes!waterstory4

See the original story here: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/real-life-stories/woman-who-started-drinking-three-4791113